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ONA Executive Director Jane Nelson.

Nurses Week to Be Celebrated May 6-12

By Jane Nelson, CAE
ONA CEO

Nurses need to celebrate!   May 6 – 12th is the week that is designated to recognize and celebrate the work Nurses do every day, 24/7.  We hope you will begin the week off wearing your “RN pin”  on May 6th in honor of RN Recognition Day and finish the week celebrating Florence Nightingale’s birthday on May 12th. Nurses need to celebrate!   May 6 – 12th is the week that is designated to recognize and celebrate the work Nurses do every day, 24/7.  We hope you will begin the week off wearing your “RN pin”  on May 6th in honor of RN Recognition Day and finish the week celebrating Florence Nightingale’s birthday on May 12th. This year’s theme is 4 Million Reasons to Celebrate, giving a nod to the sheer numbers of nurses that enrich the world we live in.  I realize that there is much to do in the way of safe staffing, patient safety, workplace violence.  However, it is important to look back and see what has been accomplished and enjoy it.  Let’s take a minute, step back and think about what you do have to celebrate, consider the following:· Let’s celebrate nurses’ commitment to addressing many public health challenges to transform health care to focus on health and wellness, in addition to illness care.  · Let’s celebrate nurses’ commitment to delivering culturally competent care and increasing diversity and inclusion in nursing.

· Let’s celebrate nurses’ ground-breaking work as researchers, executives, educators and innovators on national and global initiatives. · Let’s celebrate nurses’ ground-breaking work as researchers, executives, educators and innovators on national and global initiatives. · Let’s celebrate nurses’ influence in shaping health policy decisions that ensure all Americans have access to high-quality, affordable health care coverage.  · Let’s celebrate nurses’ role as a trusted advocate to ensure that individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations receive quality patient care and services. · Let’s celebrate nurses’ voice on important issues like immunization, health behaviors, natural disaster preparedness, education, and violence prevention.· Let’s celebrate nurses’ leadership in their organizations, on boards of directors and as elected officials at the local, state and federal levels. · Let’s celebrate nurses’ stories of strength, resilience and determination while navigating an ever-changing and complex health care landscape. · Let’s celebrate nurses’ ranking as the professionals with the highest honesty and ethical standards for the last 17 consecutive years. These results underscore the deep trust that the public has in nurses.   So this week as you celebrate Nurses Week consider how you can make a difference in your life and in the life of your patients.  Let ONA know how we can help you and other nurses advocate for change.  ONA works to advocate for nurses, the profession and your patients, but we need to hear from you to know your needs first hand.  Let’s Celebrate Nurses Week!About ONA’s Chief Executive Officer—Jane Nelson, CAE was named the CEO of the Oklahoma Nurses Association in March 2002.  She has more than 30 years of association management and marketing experience with a variety of organizations. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Purdue University and a master’s degree from Michigan State University. Nelson is a member of the American Society of Association Executives and the Oklahoma Society of Association Executives.

https://ona.nursingnetwork.com/

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Kathleen O’Grady Winston, PhD, RN.

SPECIAL TO OKNT:

Master’s Degree in Nursing: Surprising, Practical and Significant Rewards

By Kathleen O’Grady Winston, PhD, RN, College of Nursing Dean at University of Phoenix

Obtaining either an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) or Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing (BSN) is a pre-licensure pathway to becoming a Registered Nurse (RN). This is often the required academic path for entering into the Nursing profession. Earning a Master’s in Nursing (MSN) may lead to many new paths and opportunities.
An MSN helps prepare practicing Registered Nurses (RN) for advanced practice by developing skills and knowledge in specialized areas of nursing. It can help enhance a nurse’s skills by increased autonomy and expanded practice roles. The healthcare delivery arena broadens beyond acute care hospitals and other traditional healthcare settings. The experience will both challenge and change you.
Here are a few of the practical benefits associated with the MSN:
Learn advanced skills. An MSN program teaches advanced clinical skills and management strategies. The nurse’s skills expand with increased autonomy and expanded practice roles. Many MSN programs offer specialized tracks that prepare nurses to learn advanced skills that are applicable to their clinical practice and outside of the normal scope of job responsibilities.

Pursue flexible career options. Nurses who earn an MSN may be able to perform their job remotely, during shifts that are more convenient and with the freedom to determine the workday schedule. With greater flexibility and greater responsibility associated with an MSN, there is also an opportunity to extend the life of the nursing career as those with an advanced degree are often charged with less physically demanding job duties.

Increase professional networks. A graduate degree can help provide added respect from colleagues, other healthcare professionals and peers. Nurses are among the most-trusted professionals in the nation and that trust and admiration can extend and expand as nurses pursue educational and professional growth. Master’s programs in nursing help students establish valuable relationships with other nurses and professors.

Partake in lifelong learning. The master’s degree often becomes the gateway to the Ph.D. in nursing or a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). Prospective students might consider online programs, or take advantage of bridge programs that help students go directly from the pre-licensure program into a graduate program.

Make a difference. Often nurses enter the profession to make a difference in the lives of others. Expanding knowledge through advanced education can serve as an inspiration to others, including others in the profession. The personal fulfillment and professional satisfaction that accompany the MSN can be measured in the sense of accomplishment and improved self-esteem.

These are just a few of the ways an MSN can lead to career enhancement. To learn more about an MSN at University of Phoenix, visit https://www.phoenix.edu/nursing/msn.html.

About the Author
Kathleen O’Grady Winston, PhD, RN is the College of Nursing Dean at University of Phoenix. She is an accomplished nurse clinician, educator and academic Dean.

NIGHT SHIFT RNs NEEDED!
Excellent Benefit Package Provided
Licensed Nurses to work with our special needs pediatric patients 0-21 years of age. Our campus consists of 6 rehab hospital units with 6 pediatric patients in each unit. Nurses will monitor assigned hospital unit to ensure quality of patients’ health and the care that is given by Direct Care staff.
· Must have current OK Drivers license · Must be able to lift 25 lbs

Looking for something fun to do this summer?
Camp ClapHans Nurse NEEDED!
Individualized care for 12 campers per session and support from camp staff for the nightly activities.
Hours are 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. Sunday, Monday, Tuesday nights
5 weeks of Camp starting June 9. Training week of June 3rd-6th

For more info, contact Jennifer Giamelle!
Email resume to: resumes@jdmc.org
J. D. McCarty Center
2002 E. Robinson Norman, OK 73071
405-307-2800 | Fax: 405-307-2801
Visit our webpage at http://www.jdmc.org/
Take a tour at http://www.jdmc.org/video2.shtml

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Devin Davis and his family help nurses stay on the floor with their flexible certification courses.

Being there when it matters the most has always been a rule in the Davis household.
From nurses to firefighters, Devin Davis saw it all around him growing up.
It’s no wonder the family business revolves around keeping those front line professionals on the front lines when it matters the most.
Davis is a driving force behind Heartland CPR, a business his mother and father began more than 15 years ago.
The Davis family has built Heartland CPR into a successful business that revolves around providing life-saving skills in a fun, friendly environment.
Heartland CPR offers courses in CPR, AED, First Aid, Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers, Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) as well the addition of Pet First Aid + CPR.
Flexibility and customer service drive Heartland.
Devin’s mother, Ginger, coordinates with individual travel nurses and travel nursing agencies who appreciate that Heartland provides training in multiple disciplines in a single weekend. Heartland even partners with nearly hotels to offer discount accommodations to out-of-town overnight customers.
But that’s what Heartland specializes in, getting medical professionals the training and documentation they need when they need it.
One in-demand course is the S.T.A.T. program which stands for Sequentially Timed Accelerated Training. Nurses can renew the entire BLS, ACLS and PALS certification suite in a weekend.
Despite the demand, classes are limited to 10 people each.
It’s a Heartland tenet to ensure the quality of the training and the ability for students to ask questions and truly grasp the material.
To keep up, Heartland simply adds more classes. And the company’s ability to deliver training wherever the client needs it has made Heartland a nurse favorite.
From doctors to dental assistants to oil field companies, Heartland can put together a training package that fits the need.
Heartland has also become a leading supplier of AED equipment to local businesses, covering both training and equipment sales.
Devin dove deep into the family business, understanding the why as well as the how behind life-saving skills.
Not only did he enjoy teaching, he enjoyed what he was teaching.
“I like to make sure people understand the science behind it,” Davis said of the CPR classes he teaches. “You’d be shocked at how many people who don’t understand – especially ones first going into EMT or nursing school – the basic principles of CPR and what we’re actually doing. They know how to do it, they just don’t know we’re trying to fill that heart up with blood and pump that oxygenated blood into the brain and then back down to the heart.” Along the way he’s learned how to reach students that range from 18 to 80-year-olds.

https://www.heartlandcpr.com/

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Nurse Manager Jessie Lekites, BSN, RN, has helped coordinate a weeklong celebration for SSM St. Anthony nurses.

For more than 25 years now the healthcare industry has celebrated National Nurses Week.
Cakes, cookies, water bottles, pens – swag in all shapes, sizes and colors are routinely given out to nurses as small tokens of appreciation.
But for SSM Health St. Anthony Nurse Manager Jessie Lekites, BSN, RN, she wanted to go deeper while planning the health system’s recognition events this year.
The week will begin with a traditional blessing of the hands.
“We’re really trying to reach as many of our nurses personally at their place of work, at their campus to really insure everyone is involved,” Lekites said. “It will be a renewal of our purpose and the spirit of what we do.”
Lekites explained the system’s professional nurse practice model includes five elements of “I am an SSM Nurse.”
* I am accountable * I am a partner * I am an advocate * I am a professional * I am a leader.
“Typically in the past we’ve had one day we devoted to whether it’s appreciating them with gifts, cookies or snacks … this year we decided that we would make it the entire week and do an event every day.
“We really wanted to keep our emphasis on appreciating our nurses every day of the week.”
Lekites explained nurses will still be treated throughout the week – from pet therapy to popcorn – but the theme is more about celebrating and fostering deeper relationships.
“I think what we do every day is more than just a job like going to an office,” she said. “I think we’ve seen in the press and media nurses are doing more things, taking on bigger roles in healthcare. They’re putting themselves in harm’s way more than ever.
“I think it’s important this year we really recognize just the daily tasks are not what they used to be. The gravity of what we do is so big.”
When she’s not planning National Nurses Weeks, Lekites is the nurse manager of two medical surgical units. She’s been with St. Anthony since 2005.
The vision for Lekites is a simple one.
“The culture I want is I want our patients to feel safe and I want our patients to feel every person on that floor whether it’s myself, the housekeeper, the nurses, the tech that they are all there with the same purpose and there’s no other patient in the hospital but them.
“Everyone is willing to give that extra bit. No one is clocking out and leaving one behind. I think when you have that with the nursing staff it resonates straight to the patients.
They feel that and it’s tangible.”
She points to the system’s nurse residency program that walks nurses through their first year as a success.
The residency puts new nurses in touch with resources they can turn to and lets the know they are supported.
“That really gives them a sense of safety. There are people they can talk to other than just their manager. It’s an extensive network of people they can go to for support and help,” Lekites said. “I think more so now in the generations coming up it’s not just let me do my job it’s give me feedback and tell me how I’m doing. There’s a lot more give and take and constructive criticism.
“We try to be extremely inclusive in giving new nurses the opportunity to be on the unit based councils, make those decisions and guide where the process is going and have a hand in it.”
That translates into something nurses can feel.
“I think we do amazingly well,” she said “I’ve worked here for 15 years and I’ve seen the same faces. And the new ones who’ve come in the last five. The nurse techs I have on my floor when I opened the med surg unit I’m on now two and a half years ago I’m helping them find a floor that fits them.
“Once you know someone is doing the right thing the right way and they’re good for your organization you find a spot whether it’s with you or not.”

https://www.ssmhealth.com

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For 57 years, no one in Oklahoma has helped nurses look their best better than The Uniform Shoppe in Oklahoma City and Tulsa.
Since 1962, The Uniform Shoppe has been a family affair.
Albert and Jodi Weise began the Uniform Shoppe in Tulsa in 1962.
They traversed the Oklahoma highways and backroads bringing comfortable, affordable quality to nurses at their facilities.
Riding in the back seat was daughter, Jodi.
She learned the business from the best and now co-owns and manages the Tulsa location.
While the styles on the rack may change, little else has changed about this Oklahoma gem.
The Tulsa location moved around the corner to 6044 S. Sheridan Road a while back but the Oklahoma City store is still located at 10503 N. May Avenue.
Odds are you’ll see many of the same staff members when you visit again.
“The staff are knowledgeable, experienced and they care about the company,” Jodi said.
In a day of being able to order everything online nothing compares to the touch and feel of what you’re buying. And being able to ask questions and get advice from someone who knows the business.
“We have competitive pricing, too,” Weise explained. “And we’re their patients and we can’t get their services online.”
The Uniform Shoppe has hands-down always had the largest stock of scrubs for nurses, health care workers, daycare workers – every profession that requires durable-yet-professional attire while working with people.
Service has always been the focus.
The Uniform Shoppe represents most manufacturers while offering quality at the best price possible. It also offers personalized services such as monogramming and logos.
Hospital logos can be applied at customer request
Hand steaming is also offered and, if needed, staff will go to a worksite to fit an entire group.
The Uniform Shoppe also caters to a number of offices and keeps records of all customers they work with in order to know what their uniform program is at any time for them.
Nurses today want to look fashionable in ready-to-wear uniforms that are functional, Weise said. They combine fashion with function and fabric.
“They want comfort and then they want style. Those are the two most important things. Really, price just comes down to the end when they’re looking for something that’s going to last and feel comfortable,” Weise said. “When they feel good about themselves and they look good, they perform better on the job.”
White is still worn during nursing school graduations. However, the only white that is prevalent today is on lab coats, she said.
People are wearing solid colors, fun prints and styles inspired by your favorite medical TV shows.
The Uniform Shoppe continues to evolve into a better company for their customers. Jodi and her mom, Elaine, attended the Uniform University in Dallas to network with the uniform industry around the U.S.
They bring that knowledge back to the communities they serve.
“We want our community to appreciate the fact that we are a local business and are trying to provide a service as well as a product they need,” Jodi said. “We want to keep our dollars in Oklahoma so our businesses and tax dollars will go to work for us.”
Jodi said she feels fortunate that customers come to both stores. She loves seeing them again and working with them to help fill their next need.
“We love the communication and rapport that we’ve established with a lot of our customers that are repeat customers,” Jody said.
New people are always coming into the nursing field, and the Weise family is proud to provide them with a good experience. They appreciate everyone who walks through their doors.
It’s something you can feel when you walk in the door. And that comfort lasts during your shift.

https://www.theuniformshoppe.com/

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LifeSpring CEO Karen Vahlberg, BSN, RN, certified home care administrator, and her nursing leadership are ready for today’s changing health care environment.

There’s little doubt the bulk of health care delivery is rapidly moving out of the hospital and into the home.
With 38 years in nursing, Karen Vahlberg, BSN, RN knows nurses will once again be called on to provide that care no matter where it’s needed.
That’s why the CEO of LifeSpring Home Care is focused on ensuring her nurses are fulfilled in order to fulfill the needs of their clients.
LifeSpring is a faith-based company with primary values.
“We believe both in the Golden Rule – treating others as you would like to be treated – and also having a learning culture, a culture of growth and education,” Vahlberg said. “For that reason I think we stand out amongst many other employers.”
Being nurse-owned keeps the focused squarely on the patient and their families. And it allows Vahlberg to mentor her nurses and make sure they are being served as well.
“We are here to serve,” she said. “We’re here to serve our staff who serve our patients. I do believe if you take care of your staff they will take care of your patients.”
LifeSpring has served the community for 16 years, all the while owned by Vahlberg.
“We believe that health care will continue to move away from the four walls of the hospital and into the community,” Vahlberg said. “That means there will be more people and more demand. We’re also the least expensive setting of care so that’s appropriate in a world where we are trying to control health care costs. With so much GDP going to health care it’s only natural home-based care will be more desirable both to payors and those who receive the care.”
According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, U.S. health care spending increased 3.9 percent to reach $3.5 trillion, or $10,739 per person in 2017. Health care spending growth in 2017 was similar to average growth from 2008 to 2013, which preceded the faster growth experienced during the 2014-15 period that was marked by insurance coverage expansion and high rates of growth in retail prescription drug spending
Vahlberg started her home health career as a nurse in the field. She understands the challenges.
The paperwork and windshield time can add up. But the unhurried time spent with one patient at a time in their home can be the most fulfilling of a nurse’s career.
“Sometimes those can be challenging for nurses and yet I believe home health and hospice care are some of the purest forms of nursing,” she said. “In nursing school we spent our time developing care plans and trying to determine what are the things to do for our patients. That’s absolutely what you do in home health and hospice.”
Instead of operating under a generic order set created by a committee of physicians, nurses in the home are able to use the skills they’ve learned and create tailored plans for each client.
It’s a holistic approach designed to keep that patient living safely in their home as opposed to just getting them off a hospital unit.
Nursing in the home also means there’s control over a nurse’s schedule, with largely day time work.
“For nurses who are organized and like to control their lives home health and hospice are good places to go,” Vahlberg said. “What hooked me on home health from the very first day was this was where my patient wanted to be. We see the real challenges they face with their health.”
That’s one reason Vahlberg’s nurses stay with her so long.
Her home health chief clinical officer is closing in on 10 years with the company. Her hospice and personal services chief clinical officer has spent the last six years with LifeSpring.
With the focus on both nurse and patient, LifeSpring is ready for the changing face of health care, no matter what direction it takes.

https://www.lifespringhomecare.com/

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What was your first car? The Veraden Senior Living
Edmond

1976 Triumph Spitfire convertible

Brenda Cole

2010 Dodge Nitro Heat

Dakota Grandara

2008 Chevy Cobalt

Brittney Duncan

1997 Chevy Camaro

Tycha Pullen

Moore Norman Technology Center seeking PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTOR

Position will support Moore Norman’s Mission, Vision and Core Values through educating, motivating, inspiring and supporting students.
Please visit www.mntc.edu for complete job description, requirements and benefits details. Open until suitable candidate is identified.

Apply Online at www.mntc.edu or fax application to (405) 701-6718.

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NIGHT SHIFT RNs NEEDED!
Excellent Benefit Package Provided
Licensed Nurses to work with our special needs pediatric patients 0-21 years of age. Our campus consists of 6 rehab hospital units with 6 pediatric patients in each unit. Nurses will monitor assigned hospital unit to ensure quality of patients’ health and the care that is given by Direct Care staff.
· Must have current OK Drivers license · Must be able to lift 25 lbs

Looking for something fun to do this summer?
Camp ClapHans Nurse NEEDED!
Individualized care for 12 campers per session and support from camp staff for the nightly activities.
Hours are 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. Sunday, Monday, Tuesday nights
5 weeks of Camp starting June 9. Training week of June 3rd-6th

For more info, contact Jennifer Giamelle!
Email resume to: resumes@jdmc.org
J. D. McCarty Center
2002 E. Robinson Norman, OK 73071
405-307-2800 | Fax: 405-307-2801
Visit our webpage at http://www.jdmc.org/
Take a tour at http://www.jdmc.org/video2.shtml

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Debbie Boyes, RN, Hospital Liasison does an excellent job at LifeShare. Debbie is full of passion when it comes to saving lives.

by Vickie Jenkins, Staff Writer

LifeShare: Saving lives through organ, eye and tissue donations. 2018-Another record breaking year in saving and enhancing lives through donation. For the fifth consecutive year, LifeShare set organization records in organ transplanted, tissue donors recovered and lives saved.
Are you an organ or tissue donor? Did you know that there were 487 lives saved in 2018 by LifeShare donors in Oklahoma? Did you know that there were 188 organ donors and 1,036 tissue donors? Did you know that one person is added to the waiting list every ten minutes? Did you know that every day, there are twenty-two people on the waiting list that die due to not receiving an organ? These are the statistic nationwide.
Meet Debbie Boyes, RN and Hospital Liaison at LifeShare, Transplant Donor Services of Oklahoma. Debbie is the Team Lead for the Hospital Development unit. She has been a nurse for eleven years and has been with LifeShare for three and half years.
Debbie has many responsibilities that come along with her job. The Lead Team supports the families and is also considered the keeper of relationships. The Lead Team is all is responsible for all of the education that goes to LifeShare, information to physician, nurses and the Chaplain.
“I stay busy when I visit the hospitals; making relationships regarding donors plus getting to know the nurses, physicians and respiratory therapists. The Hospital Development team makes and strengthens relationships with the staff in the hospitals. They are our hospital partners and I make it my mission to make sure every single person assigned to the case is aware of everything that is going on. I go to different hospitals in Oklahoma and teach nurses about LifeShare,” Debbie commented. “I enjoy talking to the nurses, looking for opportunities to share the information and educating them on processes that LifeShare goes through,” she added. Everyone at LifeShare does a fantastic job and I am proud to be working for such a loving, caring place.”
What is your biggest asset at work? “My biggest asset at work is the support that my colleagues give to each other. Each one is a team player. Working at LifeShare is dealing with a lot of emotions. There is an incredible joy when a donor is found. On the other side of the coin, there is dealing with grief for the one that lost their life,” Debbie replied.
Asking Debbie to describe herself, she said, “I am a very positive person. I am passionate about the things I care for the most. I always try to focus on what is hand, nothing else. I have learned the benefits of problems and challenges and continue to learn all the time. We save lives and each one is a precious gift; working on a timeline, we have to stay focused. Also, I teach classes to nurses all over and it is true joy. I love my job here and nothing grabs my heart like saving a life. I know that God allowed me to have this job.”
Married to her wonderful husband, Mark, they have two children, Elizabeth and Matt. They also have four grandchildren; Jake – eleven, Rylee – nine, Dylan – six and Max is four months old. What a blessing!
Spare time is a little rare but when Debbie does have some extra time, she enjoys her hobbies, including hiking, nature photography, traveling, and golf. “I find every one of these hobbies to be very relaxing,” she said with a smile.
What motivates you to come to work every day? “As most of you probably know, when LifeShare has a donor, it leaves that family with a big void in their life. That is the sad part. That is when I have to think of something happy. I always think of a phone call. Somewhere, someone is getting a really good phone call today. I concentrate on the really good phone call from the transplant office. It is kind of like a bitter/sweet moment. I find myself living by those daily words.”
Debbie’s first job as a nurse was working at Midwest City Regional. From there, she was an RN at the Laser Spine Institute. Now, she says “My job here at LifeShare is the best job that I have ever had!”
Summing up Debbie’s life in one sentence, she said, “IT’S A GREAT RIDE!”

Moore Norman Technology Center seeking PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTOR

Position will support Moore Norman’s Mission, Vision and Core Values through educating, motivating, inspiring and supporting students.
Please visit www.mntc.edu for complete job description, requirements and benefits details. Open until suitable candidate is identified.

Apply Online at www.mntc.edu or fax application to (405) 701-6718.

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