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Latest patient care advances, annual member meeting round out conference agenda

Over 300 nurse practitioners from across the state spent three days in Tulsa, learning the latest patient care advances and applications during the Oklahoma Association of Nurse Practitioners annual conference.
AONP president Margaret Rosales said the conference was also an opportunity to remind nurse practitioners to get involved in advocating for the profession and continuing the legislative push for full practice authority.
“We’ve made incredible strides in recent years educating the public on how nurse practitioners can increase access to health care and building support for legislation that would allow us to better serve Oklahomans,” said AONP President Margaret Rosales. “With elections just around the corner, we look forward to working with new and returning legislators to improve the health of Oklahomans.”
AONP plans to work with lawmakers to introduce legislation that will allow them to work at the full scope of their education and training.
Across the country, states are increasingly turning to nurse practitioners to increase access to health care. Twenty-two states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs all allow their nurse practitioners to put their full education and training to use.
Kurtis Crawford has been a nurse practitioner for three years. He attended the University of Wyoming and earned his Doctor of Nursing Practice in 2015, then moved home to Sand Springs.
“I moved back to be close to family and immediately found out I was constrained in my practice. It was a shock,” Crawford said. “Having to have a physician’s signature and pay that provider thousands of dollars a year wasn’t something I saw in Wyoming.
“It’s really just not logical to consider me unsafe without a physician’s signature, but if I go across a state line, or walk into a veteran’s hospital, suddenly it’s safe for me to independently practice again,” he continued. “If it wasn’t for family, I’d strongly consider moving to a state with full practice.”
Rosales said the most exciting part of the conference is talking with nurse practitioners from across Oklahoma about what’s going on in their communities and in their practices.
“In communities across the state, nurse practitioners are doing some very exciting things,” she said. “This week I’ve met nurse practitioners who are serving children and families in rural Oklahoma, breaking down barriers to care for homeless individuals, planning to open new clinics and caring for their neighbors. The people who choose to enter this field are amazing and they inspire me to do better in my work each and every day.”
For more information about AONP, visit to npofoklahoma.com.

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Angie Crawford, RN, BSN, CNRI, LTCA is the proprietor of Carriage House Homes. She is a dedicated nurse, specializing in Alzheimer’s care.

by Vickie Jenkins – Writer/Photographer

Carriage House Homes has been in business for almost 4 years. It is owned and operated by Angie Crawford, RN who has over 25 years’ experience in nursing and caring for the elderly. She personally dealt with Alzheimer’s’ Disease when her grandmother became ill. She spent over 5 years caring for her in and out of different facilities.
Now, Angie is the proprietor of Carriage House Homes. She operates her own 5-bed memory care facility specializing in Alzheimer’s care. They are located in Yukon, Oklahoma in the tranquil neighborhood of Surrey Hills. Carriage House Homes is a local independent company that started as a passion to care for the elderly as family would care for their loved one.
The house itself is beautiful. A 4 bedroom, 2 baths, each room suited to the resident’s decor. There is a sunroom and garden area for the residents to enjoy the fresh air and surrounding flowers. With an open policy, family members can come by anytime to see their loved ones. Walks in the quiet neighborhood are taken and precious memories are made.
Angie grew up in Davenport, Iowa, moving several times over the years and ended up in Oklahoma. She got her bachelor’s degree from UCO. Through the years, she served as director of nursing at several facilities, along with traveling all over Oklahoma to do infusions for different health facilities.
“We have 24/7 care here and each resident is taken care of in the way that is specific for each individual. Memory care residents need more one-on-one care. I wanted to find a way to take care of 4 or 5 residents so they would have that,” Angie commented.
“On the business side, there are a lot of things that go on before a long- term-care home with residents can be approved. There are a lot of legal matters. We are an LLC and everything is up to state code. Even though I had years of experience in nursing, I had to go back to school for long- term- care certification. After a long process of remodeling and all of the legal matters taken care of, I am happy to own Carriage House Homes, giving the residents that at-home- feeling,” Angie said.
“We actually have the same rules as a 100-bed facility. The physical therapists, social workers, chaplains, depending on religion and hospice come out to see the residents if needed. We all eat our meals together and we go to some senior events together. In fact, the ladies are going to help me hand out candy to the trick-or-treaters. They like to get involved in things like that,” Angie said.
There is a slow turnover at Carriage House Homes. “Two of my ladies have been here 4 years and the other two have been here 2 years. There is a waiting list and the people have to be assessed before they come here. I am allowed to care for up to five residents,” Angie said. “The average age of our residents is 70 and up,” she added.
There are 4 other corporations in Oklahoma that have long-term-care residents. “I would like to see more homes like this, seeing the residents be cared for on a one-on- one basis,” Angie stated.
I asked Angie to describe herself to me. “Well, I am the proprietor of Carriage House Homes. I am compassionate, understanding and a problem solver. I have good nurse ethics, and feel like I am doing my work for a greater purpose, she said. “Now, on the other side, I have a type-A personality. I am headstrong and stubborn, and I don’t like to be told no. That just pushes me forward a little more,” she laughed.
What is the favorite part about your job? “My favorite part of my job is getting to know the residents and their families. There is a real bond that develops between us, forming wonderful relationships,” Angie stated.
Angie’s hobbies include spending time with her husband and daughter who is 15, gardening, taking care of the many animals on their acreage and spending time at their lake house and kayaking on Cedar Lake in Hinton, OK. Angie is also a public speaker, going around to different functions, telling about Alzheimer’s. She also works with Animal Rescue, caring for animals in any way that she can help.
Wise words from Angie “Don’t worry about anything. Let God steer the ship. Let Him take care of everything. He can handle it.”

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How would you change nursing for the better? Integris Health Edmond

We would establish in our state more resources for the less fortunate with mental health and drug addiction issues.

Joy Carpenter, RN

A lot of time people have a bad experience in a hospital and that carries over. I’d love to see them know they’ll be taken care of.

Claire Creecy, RN

I think we really need to focus on federally-regulated nurse-to-patient ratios.

Chance Perry MacNeill, RN

Being in a position to where you would go to the patient instead of the patient coming to you.

Holly Wennersten, RN

RN CHARGE NURSE
Seeking quality RN Charge Nurse (11pm – 7am and 7am – 3pm) for our team of caring,
dedicated professionals who desire to make a difference every day.
Work in a positive team environment with leaders who value our staff and the chance to make a difference in the lives of those we serve.
Golden Age Nursing Home is located in historic downtown Guthrie….just a short drive from Oklahoma City and Edmond.
Apply on-line at www.companionhealth.net

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Q. I have been dating my boyfriend for six months. He has some really great attributes, however one negative is his lack of gift giving. Not big gifts, sometimes just a sticky note to surprise me with an “I Love You,” or a funny card or flowers would be nice. I have mentioned this to him, he says he will try to remember but it doesn’t last. Should this be a deal breaker? –Ellen

A. Your boyfriend’s lack of gift giving could be a deal breaker if this is something you need. While you are dating it might be a great idea if you both committed to reading, The Five Love Languages” written by Dr. Gary Chapman. In my opinion this book should be required reading for all couples, preferably before the relationship gets too serious. It should be required for singles so there is an understanding of what love means so you don’t waste your time on someone who misses the mark.
Dr. Chapman lists the following 5 Love Languages:
1. Acts of service – handyman projects, making favorite meal, housework.
2. Words of affirmation – “you are amazing,” “I’m so glad you are my girlfriend,” “I appreciate you.”
3. Physical touch – hand holding, affectionate hugs, snuggling, sex
4. Receiving Gifts – small ways (or big) to leave reminders of love and caring
5. Quality time – not just hours of time together but time well spent, even if it is just sitting together, being present to one another.
So if you have done your homework before dating and know how you desire to be loved, the idea is not to waste your time on someone who does not speak your language. Once you see it is not happening don’t make excuses, hope it will change or decide to “wait it out.”
The idea for the couple learning each others love language is to try to meet that need to create a more harmonious relationship. It can be difficult if Joe does not need gifts for himself but Cindy does. Once Cindy expresses to Joe this is something she needs and loves then it is up to Joe to try and speak Cindy’s language.
Here is an example: Cindy and Joe made an appointment for marriage counseling. During the first session Cindy expressed how much she would like Joe to show his love for her with silly sticky notes on the bathroom mirror, a card left on the kitchen table, flowers just to say I Love You. She was very clear that gifting was one of her love languages. When it was Joe’s turn to talk he said, “That is just not what I do, I don’t think about it, you have married the wrong guy if that is what you need.” Cindy sat on the sofa with tears rolling down her face. It was very sad.
We need to know ourselves; we need to know when something isn’t working; we need to make changes. It is almost a guarantee that we will become resentful if someone isn’t meeting our needs. Resentments grow, they do not magically disappear.
No one is perfect. Everyone has flaws. It is important to know what you need and make choices accordingly. If you want someone to give you gifts, notice if they give them to you when dating and if it continues. It your language is quality time, don’t keep dating someone who doesn’t give it to you.

Vicki L Mayfield, M.Ed., R.N., LMFT Marriage and Family Therapy Oklahoma City

If you would like to send a question to Vicki, email us at news@okcnursingtimes.com

Small-town lifestyle. Big-time benefits.
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Less than an hour from Tulsa, Muskogee features outstanding cultural and natural
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Be part of a rapidly growing, locally owned and operated, not-for-profit organization
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To learn more about nursing opportunities at Saint Francis Hospital Muskogee, please
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*Applies to registered nurses in select patient units with at least two years of nursing experience. Two-year work commitment
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**View program details at studentaid.ed.gov.
EOE Protected Veterans/Disability

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Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation physician-scientist Hal Scofield, M.D.

Some people enjoy the feeling of being scared. Others hate it.
Either way, the physical response is the same for all of us, said Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation physician-scientist Hal Scofield, M.D. When things go bump in the night, the body launches a cascade of events to help you deal with the perceived threat.
So, what exactly happens when you see a spider, have near-miss accident or get startled by an overzealous trick-or-treater?
“Your internal systems immediately spring into action,” said OMRF’s Scofield. “What we call the sympathetic nervous system tells nerve pathways to alert the adrenal glands, which pump adrenaline into your bloodstream. The combined effects are known as the fight-or-flight response.”
You’ve likely experienced the fight-or-flight response: respiration increases, your heart pounds, muscles tense, your hair stands on end, and you might start sweating or break out with goose bumps.
The body pulls off this feat almost instantaneously. But those biological triggers don’t tell you which to do—tussle or turn tail. That’s up to the brain to evaluate.
The speed of this response is why some people are able to jump out of the way of a moving car before they even process what has happened. In fact, said Scofield, that’s the reason it exists. “It’s all about survival.”
The part of the brain where the response starts—the amygdala—cannot distinguish between real and perceived threats, he added, “That’s why horror movies elicit fear, even when you know what you’re seeing can’t hurt you.”
Of course, you know your life isn’t in danger when you’re watching “Friday the 13th.” “But in the case of real, imminent danger, this response ensures you’re ready to react,” said Scofield.
The sweating, racing heart and stress brought on by fear can feel unnatural and disorienting, but this primal instinct actually has a valuable purpose. “It makes you think more clearly and become more acutely aware of your surroundings,” said the OMRF researcher.
That may not be helpful when you’re curled up on your sofa watching “The Shining” on Netflix. But if you’re ever facing a true threat, it could make the difference between life and death.

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David Kallenberger, M.D., and Crysten Cheatwood, D.O., are physician partners who practice obstetrics and gynecology at INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center.

David Kallenberger, M.D., and Crysten Cheatwood, D.O., are physician partners who practice obstetrics and gynecology at INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center in Oklahoma City. But what makes their partnership so extraordinary, is that they share a professional and personal bond very few will ever experience.
Cheatwood has known Kallenberger her entire life – literally. In fact, he was the one who physically brought her into this world, as the physician who delivered her as a newborn. “I could not have imagined 33 years ago when I delivered Crysten that she one day would be working with me,” admits Kallenberger. “This is indeed a full circle moment for me.”
“He was my grandmother’s OBGYN then he was my mother’s doctor, so I was familiar with his name and reputation very early on,” says Cheatwood. “I can remember being young enough that my mom would make me stay in the changing room during her exams.”
“I also saw Dr. Kallenberger at all of my mom’s prenatal visits when she was pregnant with my sister. He could tell I was curious so he was always asking me questions and volunteering information regarding my mom’s pregnancy. He made it a point to include me in all of the conversations.”
Kallenberger was equally impressed with young Cheatwood. “She made an impression on me at a very young age. She would ask questions that were very inquisitive and profound for a 12 year old. She was always probing for more information.”
Cheatwood remembers being fascinated by medicine and almost obsessed with her mother’s pregnancy. “I attended every doctor’s appointment. I even read the “What to Expect When You’re Expecting” book with my mom. I was completely invested.”
The day her sister, Hannah, was born, Cheatwood was in the delivery room. That is when her fate was sealed. “I was standing with my dad at the head of the bed when Dr. K walked into the room. He said, ‘Crissy… do you want to deliver this baby?’ Wondering if he was actually serious, I nodded my head yes. He said, ‘go over to the sink and wash up to your elbows, we’ll help you with some gloves.’ He told me where to put my hands and then put his hands over mine. And then he talked me through the whole thing!”
From that moment on, Cheatwood knew exactly what she wanted to be when she grew up. She wanted to be an OBGYN just like her newfound idol, “Dr. K.”
“She was a natural,” says Kallenberger recalling her sister’s birth. “She was not shocked, she just jumped right in without question and working with my hands literally delivered her sister. It was an amazing experience. In a way, a doctor was also born that day.”
Cheatwood shadowed Kallenberger several times during high school, college and medical school. She did a couple rotations with him again during her residency training. Now, with her medical degree in hand, she is Kallenberger’s newest partner.
Cheatwood remembers the moment he made her the offer to come work with him. “I was speechless initially, again wondering if he was actually serious. And then I nodded my head yes. It was wildly similar to the reaction I had when he asked if I wanted to deliver my sister all those years ago.”
“I feel like I’ve been shadowing him for 22 years,” laughs Cheatwood. “He has afforded me a tremendous amount of encouragement and exposure. He is a phenomenal teacher and an exceptional physician. I hope to continue following in his footsteps.”
Kallenberger has no doubt that Cheatwood will tread her own path, and is beyond proud of the physician she has become. “It is somewhat surreal working with her but I have worked with her so many times over the years as a mentor or as faculty that it feels natural.”
“I don’t know that this is necessarily a passing of the torch,” continues Kallenberger. “But I do want to groom her to be able to take over my practice one day when I decide to retire. It is comforting to know that someone with her compassion and skill set will be available to take care of my patients in the same way that I have tried to do over the last 42 years.”
Kallenberger estimates that he has delivered more than 15,000 babies in his lifetime. While he says some of them have grown up to be doctors, he says Cheatwood is the first he’s ever had the privilege to call partner.
“The transition we’ve made from student/teacher to colleagues has been interesting and entertaining,” Cheatwood jokes. “A few days after I started here, he told me to call him David now. I still can’t do it without laughing a little bit. I’ve heard people talk about their “work wife” or “work husband.” We definitely have a “work father/daughter” relationship. I have so much respect for him. He’s been such an advocate for me as a new physician. Even though I’m working beside him now, I will always look up to him.”

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Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientist Swapan Nath, Ph.D.

Two Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists have received $3.6 million in new grants from the National Institutes of Health.
The two grants will enable OMRF’s Swapan Nath, Ph.D., and Joel Guthridge, Ph.D., to examine genes thought to play a role in lupus, a disease in which the immune system becomes unbalanced and attacks the body’s own tissues. Lupus can result in damage to the joints, skin, kidneys, heart and lungs.
Lupus impacts approximately 1.5 million Americans, predominantly women, and there is a well-documented genetic association with the disease. However, it is notoriously difficult to diagnose and treat because of how widely it varies from person to person.
“We know lupus has a strong genetic basis, but in order to better treat the disease we have to identify the genes associated with it,” said Nath. “By understanding where and how genetic defects arise will allow scientists to develop more effective therapies specifically targeting those genes.”
A four-year grant will enable Nath and Guthridge to study the roles of a pair of genes believed to contribute to lupus onset. Nath also received a second, two-year award to look at two more genes believed important to lupus development across ethnically diverse populations.
According to Guthridge, identifying the genes associated with the disease—and how they impact disease progression—is crucial in the ongoing effort to understand how to best combat lupus.
“By discovering the roles of specific genes, we hope we can one day get to the point of tailoring therapeutic strategies to each individual lupus patient,” said Guthridge.
More than 16,000 people are diagnosed with lupus in the U.S. each year. According to the Lupus Foundation of America, the disease affects as many as 1.5 million Americans and 5 million people worldwide.
“The ultimate goal of this work is to enable more accurate diagnosis and prediction of therapeutic responses in order to improve patient care,” said Guthridge
Guthridge joined OMRF’s scientific staff in 2002. An assistant member of its Arthritis & Clinical Immunology Research Program, he also serves as director of OMRF’s biorepository, an ultra-cold library of patient samples maintained for research purposes.
Nath joined OMRF’s scientific staff in 2000 and holds the William H. & Rita Bell Chair in Biomedical Research. He is an internationally respected leader in the study of genetic risk factors for lupus and other autoimmune diseases.
Both new grants were awarded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (R01 AI132532-01A1, 1 R21 AR073750-01), a part of the National Institutes of Health.

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Parents Responding to Infant Death Experience (PRIDE) will be hosting their next burial service on Monday, Nov. 5.
PRIDE is an intervention team of nurses, chaplains and social workers who are available to answer any questions people may have about their experience with miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth or neonatal death, and offer support through the grief process.
PRIDE provides two no cost burial services for infants less than 20 weeks gestation at Sunset Memorial Park Cemetery, 2301 E. Indian Hills Rd. in Norman, each year. Losses occurring from October 1 through March 31 will be buried the first Monday in May. Losses occurring from April 1 to September 30 will be buried the first Monday in November.
The next burial service is scheduled for 2 p.m. Nov. 5 at Sunset Memorial Park Cemetery.

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Brooke Butcher, MS, RN, is starting a unique, online education model to help students make it through nursing school.

by Bobby Anderson, RN, Staff Writer

Those dreaded days of nursing school.
As a student and as a professor, Brooke Butcher, MS, RN remembers those days well.
The only difference was which side of the struggle she was on.
“It is completely overwhelming,” Butcher said of nursing school. “I feel like overwhelm is the biggest problem in nursing school, or at least I remember it being that way for me. Not knowing what information was important, not being able to ferret out what I actually needed to know versus what was superfluous fluff.”
“That coupled with in clinical you might not be working with a pleasant nurse or you might not have good interaction or help from your nursing instructor.”
It was those reasons she began working on The Nursing Professor, an online service dedicated to helping nursing students not only survive but thrive in nursing school.
“Most of the resources you find online are by nursing students,” Butcher explained. “They aren’t necessarily a higher quality or they don’t contain enough to give a really solid base for the material.”
Butcher also points to the huge lack of clinical experiences for students.
“My grandmother lived at the hospital and they ran the floor by the time they could graduate,” said Butcher, whose grandmother and mother were nurses. “They were in the hospital way more than they were in the classroom.”
Butcher’s master’s thesis focused on nurse residency programs, which were borne from high washout rates of first-year nurses who either left their first job or the profession entirely within their first two years.
The support wasn’t there.
Her vision is for The Nursing Professor to stand in the gap.
“I would love to see it evolve into a one-stop-shop where students can come to find all the answers they’re looking for related to nursing school,” Butcher said. “Covering content but also job hunting, help with resumes and interview skills and information about getting started as a new nurse.”
For now, the best way to connect with Butcher is by email at thernprofessor@gmail.com or visit her Facebook page The Nursing Professor.
Butcher earned her master’s degree in 2011 and began teaching at Oklahoma City Community College.
She worked with the LPN career ladder track for students pursuing their RN. After a year she transitioned to teaching NP4 content.
She stayed until 2015.
She has a varied nursing background. She worked ER, cardiac neuro ICU and an HIV unit in New York City before coming to Oklahoma Heart Hospital in 2009.
Butcher worked at Oklahoma Heart while she was teaching and taking care of her two young children.
“Right off the bat when I was teaching,” Butcher said of when she came up with the concept. “We could only provide students with so much information otherwise you’re just giving them answers and teaching to the test. I found myself developing a lot of resources they could utilize.”
“I was trying to find things online that would work. I wasn’t finding a whole lot. I was finding a lot for medical students but not for nursing students.”
“I talked to other faculty members and they thought (the idea) was ridiculous.”
She shelved the idea for a while but kept coming back to it.
Apparently, it was her passion.
“I feel like I have a good way of breaking down information for students in a way that is very easy for them to understand,” she said.
She was contacted by students looking for tutoring.
She shared with them her idea of a one-stop-shop of resources for nursing students that would be cost effective at a time when students needed it the most.
“As a nursing student I could hardly afford a cup of coffee,” she remembered. “I made a mockup of what I wanted to do and unbeknownst to me they posted it on the class Facebook page. Within 24 hours one of the students sent me back all of the names and more than 40 students had asked for this.”
Butcher’s service is more than a data content warehouse. She routinely engages students through Facebook Live Q&A sessions.
Butcher is still working full-time while developing the product with an anticipated full launch date of next fall.
She’s currently accepting beta students at a discounted rate for NP4 content access. She’ll be bringing the other nursing processes online as she builds them.
Butcher typically stresses three things to her nursing students:
* Take care of yourself – eating well, exercising and getting adequate sleep are important in nursing school to keep you well and keep your mind sharp.
* Don’t just memorize while in school, learn the material and understand the rationale behind our interventions and the basic pathophysiology behind each disease process, because that is what will help you know what to do when you are face to face with your patient.
* Know your preferred learning style (or how you learn best) and utilize the learning resources that speak to that preferred learning style, as you are far more likely to understand it and remember when you do so.

 

FROM OUR JOB BOARD! CLINICAL RESEARCH NURSE NEEDED
Posting Number: 0001190
Title: Clinical Research Nurse
Working Title: Clinical Research Nurse
Position Type: OTHER
Classification: Ongoing
Status: Full-Time
Department: Arthritis and Clinical Immunology (ACI)
Job Summary/Basic Function:
Coordinates and executes rheumatology research projects. Performs nursing duties in a rheumatology research clinic setting including research and data management, patient care, sample collection and processing, and medication administration. Tasks require a high level of organizational skills and the ability to ask the right questions to determine proper course of action while following established standards and research protocols.
DUTIES: 1. Clinical Trials. Conducts research and assists researchers by recruiting patients, determining eligibility for clinical trials, and seeing patients through research studies including obtaining informed consent, administering questionnaires, taking medical histories, study drug administration, assessing and reporting adverse events, and performing all study related tasks as outlined in study protocols and in adherence with GCP, ICH, and HIPAA regulations. 2. Chart Review. Performs medical chart review to abstract data for research including but not limited to constructing medical history and medications chronology, evaluating disease progression, and mapping symptom and biomarker associations. 3. Communication. Liaises between principal investigator, patients, third party patient care service providers, research sponsors, and governing agencies to ensure strict adherence to protocol and regulations throughout study conduct. Excellent written and oral communications required. 4. Patient Care. Assesses and records symptoms, vital signs, and other patient information required for research protocols and to prepare patient for examination. Review records for documentation of study inclusion/exclusion criteria. Carries out physician orders for testing and treatment and coordinates follow-up care of patients. 5. Sample Collection. Collects samples from patients including blood, urine, saliva, etc. Prepares samples for analysis or shipment. Collects all laboratory reports, data, and records. Excellent phlebotomy skills required. 6. Medication Administration. Under direction of physician or other medical personnel, administers FDA approved and investigational medications to patients. IV certification preferred. 7. Data Management. Gathers, organizes, analyzes, and submits patient and research data to principal investigators, scientists, and sponsors. Computer skills required. 8. As Needed. Performs various duties as needed to successfully fulfill the function of the position.
Minimum Qualifications: Associate’s degree in Nursing from an accredited practical nursing program Certification and registration as a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Registered Nurse (RN) in the State of Oklahoma 1 year of relevant experience.  Valid Oklahoma Nursing License required.
Minimum Degree Required: Associates Degree
Work Hours: Typically Monday through Friday 8:30am to 5pm
Preferred Qualifications: Clinical research experience and research certification, CCRC or CCRP
Rheumatology or other autoimmune experience strongly preferred
Physical Demands Regularly required to stand, walk, talk, listen, use manual dexterity, and reach with arms and hands. Occasionally required to sit, stoop, or kneel and lift or move up to 10 pounds. Vision requirements include close vision, color vision, and ability to adjust focus. Occasionally exposed to viruses from participants/patients. The noise level is usually moderate.
Application Type Accepted: General Application Required Applicant Documents: Resume/Curriculum Vitae
Optional Applicant Documents: Cover Letter Quicklink for Posting:
http://apptrkr.com/1316503

 

 

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Normal Regional Health System employees were treated to a week of appreciation after the hospital system surpassed its financial and operational goals for the previous fiscal year.

by Bobby Anderson, RN, Staff Writer

Paula Price, MPH, MSN, RN has devoted more than 30 years to the Norman Regional Health System.

For more than three decades, Paula Price, MPH, MSN, RN has worked for the Norman Regional Health System.
The vice president of strategy and growth has seen her hospital do a lot of great things but the recent week-long Fall Festival brought a smile to her face.
After all internal audits were completed and approved by the hospital board, Norman Regional announced the system had met or surpassed all of its operational goals for the previous fiscal year which ended June 30.
That not only meant a comfortable operating margin but an opportunity to reward all healers for reaching those goals.
“It was to thank them for all their hard work last year. We really had a successful year and worked very hard to make sure we met our quality, service and operational goals for the year,” Price said of the week-long festivities. “Because of that and how hard our employees worked we wanted to thank them in a different way.”
The week kicked off with the hospital bringing in local food trucks and parking them in front of each campus for both day and night shifts.
Every employee was treated to a free lunch or dinner. Gyros, barbeque and other items were available for employees to pick up free of charge with a drink and all the fixings.
“We had no idea (how busy we would be),” one vendor said while cooking made-to-order tacos as quickly as she could.
On Tuesday massage therapists were brought in and set up near the cafeterias. Employees were offered complimentary five-minute chair massages.
Hump day brought a car wash service to the hospital where employees could valet their cars and have them detailed during their shift.
Once their shift was over they were treated to a clean car for the ride home.
“We received a lot of emails and verbal thanks and appreciation that we did something different, something fun and novel for us,” Price said. “They really appreciate that we recognize how dedicated they are to patients, care and all the hard work they’ve done.”
“It’s been fun for both of us for the executive team as well as the hospital board.”
Prior to her current role, Price previously served as the Health System’s Director of Health Promotion and Community Relations for the past 20 years. Her healthcare experience includes nursing, public health, community relations, marketing and communications.
Free drinks were offered all day Thursday and then employees were given the freedom to wear any college apparel of their choice during their shift.
Fiscal year 2018 was a good one for the system – one of only a handful of municipally-owned hospitals in Oklahoma.
Price said the hospital saw nearly 17,000 admissions with 2,515 babies delivered. Some 270,000 outpatient registrations were logged as were more than 95,000 emergency department visits.
The system before more than 89,000 imaging exams, had 265,953 physician clinic visits and 243,417 physical therapy treatments.
More than 3,400 heart caths were performed.
EMSSTAT made more than 20,000 combined runs in the Norman and Moore services areas.
The hospital was able to provide more than half a million dollars in contributions to Norman Public Schools and make a community contributions in excess of $1.7 million.
The system was honored numerous times including:
* Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade “A” for both Norman Regional Hospital and Norman Regional Healthplex
* Women’s Choice Awards for Best Hospitals for Stroke Center and Bariatric Surgery
* American Heart Association Mission: Lifeline Gold Plus Award EMS
* American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get with the Guidelines Stroke Silver Plus Quality Achievement Award
* Chest Pain Center accreditation from the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care
* Certified Healthy Business Excellence for the 15th consecutive year
* Providing a virtual pediatrician for Norman Public Schools
* Proving health and wellness education to 16 schools in Moore and 17 schools in Norman.
Price said the results warranted more than just a thanks to employees. Gainsharing checks were also distributed by each department manager.
“It just reminds you of how important it is and what health care workers and professionals do on a daily basis,” Price said. “They’re so dedicated to their patients, to one another and to the health system because they know what we do is improve quality of life for people and help them heal.”
“When you see that in action and set goals that are a challenge but achievable, I had no doubt we would reach them because when we started down this journey … you could tell and feel we were going to achieve what we needed to to do for the year.”
“It’s so rewarding to see how hard everyone worked and then to appreciate them for that.”

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